Tips-and-Tricks-in-Mavericks.com

Tips-and-Tricks-in-Mavericks.com

Tips and Tricks in Mavericks LogoTips and Tricks in Mavericks was a more or less spontaneous idea of our CEOs Daniel and Fabian after Apple unveiled its plans for the 10th version of their desktop operating system for Macs, OS X Mavericks, during the World Wide Developer Conference in mid-June of 2013. The idea was to build a weblog where any new feature, bug or other changes could be talked about that both of them might find during the beta stages (Developer Previews) of OS X Mavericks in their daily routines of working with that new OS. With Ruben, a writer was quickly found and put in charge of writing the blog entries, looking after the blog comments and communicating the posts via social networks like Facebook and Twitter, among others.

Tips and tricks in Mavericks Screenshot PostThroughout the course of six months, 95 blog posts were written and published covering everything between the release of a new beta over the introduction of newly bundled apps to the smallest design changes in the user interface.

Tips and tricks in Mavericks Screenshot SEOWe set our goal to reach out as broadly as possible, not just through the use of social media, but also through on-page search engine optimization (SEO) of our website and our content. A dedicated SEO plugin was used to in this case. Knowing that that would only half do the trick, we made sure to link back and forth to other websites (off-page optimization). This way, we quickly became a top 10 recurring address for search requests on Google concerning tricks about OS X Mavericks.

Tips and tricks in Mavericks Screenshot VisitorsWe were able to work at scale from the beginning. With our cloud-based server solution and the rock solid WordPress content management system (CMS), we made sure that this website could handle suddenly increasing numbers of visitors. At first, only small amounts of visitors were noticed due to the nature of a closed beta program. However, after the public release of Mavericks, those numbers skyrocketed from around 350 visitors per day to over 12.000 visitors per day. We gained more than 500 likes on Facebook and more than 3.700 followers on Twitter, making our social media activities a far greater success than we had first anticipated.

User feedback was phenomenal, ranging from replies on Twitter (sometimes dozens per day) to comments on Facebook and on the website all the way to bug and feature reports via email from returning visitors.

For all of us at simpleTechs, this project was a big Thank You to the community. We just wanted to give back for all the hundreds and hundreds of hours that free resources on the Internet have helped us learn new things or figure out why stuff simply didn’t work the way we had hoped it would. Freely available knowledge is one of the best things about the Internet, and this project was our small contribution to that idea.